Crowdmanaged farm offers participants a share of the crop

Crowdmanaged farm offers participants a share of the crop

Crowdmanagement has already hit the farming industry in the UK in the form of the National Trust’s MyFarm project, which has called upon farmers to help run an estate over the web. Now a Portuguese enterprise with a similar name – MyFarm.com – is offering online farmers a chance to reap a share of the produce.

Developed by a teacher and students from the Polytechnic Institute of Beja, the project offers a 49 sq m plot of land for an initial payment of EUR 60, which is converted into 600 points to be used when controlling the activity on the farm via the internet. The monthly lease of the plot costs EUR 25 and users can purchase more points with cash (EUR 1 equals 10 points). The user interacts with the plot through a game-like interface — think FarmVille — choosing what seeds to sow, when to sow them, and how many to sow. Information is offered to help online farmers get the best out of their crops. When the user has designed their plot, details are sent to farm management teams, who set to work within three working days, weather permitting. Customers are sent a message whenever they need to make a decision, with technical help on hand for those without thorough knowledge of farming. Users enter a delivery address and receive a sample of their work once it is ripe for eating. MyFarm.com enables city dwellers to get a taste of running their own vegetable farm, while gaining knowledge of the process which has gone into making the food they receive at the end.

The project aims to engage consumers with the food they eat in an exciting and interactive way, as well as promote healthy living by offering organic vegetables for a low monthly cost. One to consider replicating where you are?

Website: www.myfarm.com.pt
Contact: geral@myfarm.com.pt

Spotted by: Alberto Sequeira

Farmers use vending machines to sell produce

Source : http://www.springwise.com/food_beverage/regiomat/

In a world wrapped up in complex supply chains, small farmers are in a catch-22: sell to the supermarkets and get less cash for your carrots, or spend a lot more time and effort trying to sell directly to customers. Consumers, meanwhile, are torn between loyalty to local businesses and the convenience of those established supply chains. Now a German farm, Peter-und-Paul-Hof, has found a solution in the form of… vending machines. The result of a collaboration between the farm and vending manufacturer Stuewer, the specially designed Regiomat machines currently sell fresh milk, eggs, butter, cheese, potatoes and sausage in thirteen German towns and communities.

It’s not a solution that sprung up overnight. Initially, Peter-und-Paul-Hof were operating a service delivering milk to their customers. Finding this too time-consuming, they began encouraging customers to collect the milk from fridges on their farm, which proved successful and inspired them to use vending machines as a more versatile solution. The Regiomat machines can be placed outdoors 365 days a year as long as they’re under a roof (some have even been placed alongside hiking trails in Switzerland), effectively giving locals a 24-hour farmers’ market and farmers a lot more free time. By cutting out the middleman, this system also offers potential savings over retail stores. An update to the traditional farm stand that is beneficial to both farmers and local-loving consumers, this is definitely a concept we can see spreading to other parts of the world. (Related: Vending machines for healthy food.)

Website: www.stuewer.de/automaten/regiomat/index.htmlwww.peter-paul-hof.de
Contact: automaten@stuewer.de

Minibars at Ace Hotel stocked with local liquor

Source : http://www.springwise.com/food_beverage/acehotel/

Ace Hotel in Portland has partnered with local distillers House Spirits to stock their minibars with limited-edition artisan spirits. In addition to gin, vodka, rum and blended whiskey, guests can also get a cocktail kit including fresh citrus, bucket of ice, cocktail shaker, jigger and martini glasses. Plus cocktail recipe cards for amateur mixologists in need of inspiration.

Launched by native Northwesterners in 2004, House Spirits Distillery makes its spirits on SE 7th Avenue, less than two miles from Ace Hotel’s lobby. Its Apothecary Line—a collection of small-batch, limited edition spirits packaged in individually numbered 375 ml bottles—is currently only available at its own Apothecary Tasting Room, and in the Portland Ace Hotel. By offering guests an exclusive homegrown product, the hotel adds a unique element to their experience while supporting the local economy. Move over, Absolut and Toblerone 😉 (More urban beekeeping, this time atop a Toronto hotelLoews Hotels adopt local farmers.)

Website: www.acehotel.com/portland